Cast your votes!

Cage match is on! ONE VICTOR WILL STAND ALONE. Or some crap like that. We narrowed it down to 7 finalists, and we need help making the final decisions. Please cast your votes in the blog comment section. In no particular order... (photos should be clickable to get the full-sized versions where applicable) Mr. Bohnert's sunlit cruiser bohnert_1 Bryce's VFR, standing out in the crowd: bryce_1 Clay's flat tracker bringing sexy to the party: clay_1 Dan Yowell's R6/HDR: dan_yowell_1 Mr. Gillenwater's Maximus Veus: gillenwater_1 Kevin Kocher's traipsing 'Strominator: kevin_kocher_1 Will Munck's Painted Italian Water Monster: will_munck_1 What say ye...?

Episode 163 – The 2013 holiday buying guide

Episode 163 - The 2013 holiday buying guide November 27, 2013 ThePaceFINAL-300x116
After announcing something so grandiose, I feel like I should pay homage to Stan Lee and yell EXCELSIOR! But I'm not going to do that. Instead, what I'm going to do is say that we had a good time compiling this list of suggestions from the listeners, with special thanks to Rick, Matt Murto and Kelly Mills. Thanks so much, folks! These are all great suggestions, and we hope everyone has a good time with it. In addition to the guide, we want to announce that the raffle winner has been chosen for the Aeromoto Sport Air leather motorcycle jacket. And that winner is... (insert dramatic pause here...) James Enny. James, congratulations. Look for an email from us very soon and we'll get the jacket right out to you. Thank you to all the entrants, and to all the listeners for the ongoing support. We're a very lucky and fortunate couple of pod-gabbers. raffle James and I also want to announce that we've (re)opened The Pace Podcast online forums. The forums will include weekly show postings and feedback, discussion about other bike topics, a market place, and all sorts of chit-chat. Log in and create a forum account today at http://thepacepodcast.com/forums/. And now... links. Links for you, links for me, links to click and links to see!

Digital tire pressure gauge http://roadgear.com/digital-tire-gauge-p-40.html

Reflective wheel tape for safety http://www.tapeworks.com/Rimstripes/RimstripesHome.html

Spork http://www.lightmyfire.com/products/wild-kitchen-collection/spork/spork-original.aspx

Black 1" wide reflective tape for the back of luggage bags http://solutions.3m.com/wps/portal/3M/en_US/Marine/Home/Products/Catalog/?PC_Z7_RJH9U5230GE3E02LECIE20S4K7000000_nid=GSVN9HB7GSgs2875VTTP9SglGSS8PJ58BMbl Scala g9 bluetooth headset http://www.cardosystems.com/scala-rider/scala-rider-g9 Foggy Respro http://respro.com/store/product/foggy-mask Hyperlights http://www.hyperlites.com/ Scarfs – silk scarf, tube scarf, Buff http://www.zubwear.com/outdoors.html http://www.buffwear.com/

Helmetlok & cable http://www.helmetlok.com/all-products/1-helmetlok/26-helmetlok-with-cable

Anti-fog paste for glasses, spray for face shields http://www.zooke.com/ Side stand plate for grass or hot pavement ( Add a string so you don't have to bend down to pick it up ) http://kickstandplate.com/

Gift certificate to Revzilla, New Enough, etc. http://www.revzilla.com/product/revzilla-gift-certificate http://www.compacc.com/p/gift-certificates-gift-cards http://www.motorcyclegear.com/browse/gift_certificate

Yellow safety vest from Cycle Gear – only if there’s interest http://www.cyclegear.com/nav/cat3/street_protection_vests/0 Under layers – wicking t-shirts, socks, etc. http://www.ldcomfort.com/ http://www.rei.com/product/844121/rei-tech-t-shirt-mens Rain gear jacket and over pants – something inexpensive from Cycle Gear http://www.revzilla.com/firstgear-rain-gear http://www.revzilla.com/revit-rain-gear http://www.cyclegear.com/CycleGear/Street/Suits/Two-Piece/Textile/brand/NELSON-RIGG/SR-6000-Stormrider-Rainsuit/p/28336_59409_2

Backpack designed for motorcyclist that can carry a helmet http://www.revzilla.com/motorcycle-backpacks

Helmet bag – fleece lined to protect the helmet from bumps http://www.revzilla.com/motorcycle-luggage#v2-facets%5B%5D=469&page=1&page_size=96&sort=featured&tab=all

Microfiber towels to clean bike, eyeglasses, face shields, windscreens, etc. http://www.autogeek.net/mictow.html

Paper oil funnels to top off oil on the road http://www.cyclenutz.com/Fast-Funnel-Disposable-Paper-Funnel_p_149.html Heated grips – kit or get them installed http://www.motorcycle-superstore.com/1314/mngr/heated-grips.aspx

RAM mount for GPS or smartphone http://www.rammount.com/products/motorcycles.htm#/

Motorcycle travel books to area of interest http://www.amazon.com

Subscription to a motorcycle magazine http://www.mcnews.com/mcn/ http://www.roadrunner.travel/ http://www.sportrider.com/

Mad Map of your area https://www.madmaps.com/

Copy of Proficient Motorcycling http://www.amazon.com/Proficient-Motorcycling-Ultimate-Guide-Riding/dp/1889540536

First Aid kit to keep on the bike http://www.rei.com/product/800904/rei-day-pack-first-aid-kit

Bungee nets http://www.cyclegear.com/CycleGear/Accessories/Luggage/Other-Luggage/brand/TRACKSIDE/Cargo-Net/p/36521_59409 Bike cover http://www.cyclegear.com/CycleGear/Accessories/Security/Covers/brand/BiLT/Deluxe-Motorcycle-Cover/p/33154_2 http://www.motorcyclegear.com/parts/accessories/covers_/dowco/guardian_weatherall_plus_ez_zip_motorcycle_cover.html Case of oil http://www.amazon.com/Royal-Purple-12130-API-Licensed-Performance/dp/B000BNYMWS Flash 2 Pass garage door opener http://www.amazon.com/Flash2Pass-103102-Complete-Access-Motorcycles/dp/B001AWDMQG Amazon Prime subscription http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00DBYBNEE?_encoding=UTF8&*Version*=1&*entries*=0 Pocket digital camera http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss_1?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=pocket%20digital%20camera  

What’s Cap riding…?

In the upcoming Captain America 2: The Winter Soldier, Cap is seen chasing someone down on a motorcycle. But, what is it? Hmmm. Ducati Monster made love to a Sportster and birthed this thing...? I've been trying to figure out just WHICH Sportster model it was, then I noticed a few tell-tale things on it that point it away from being a Sportie at all. Eh...? So, what are your guesses? Something one-off for the movie? Something upcoming? Something older that we just don't recognize? capsbike

I present to you…

magna4... Erik Johnson's 1999 Honda Magna (4th or 5th generation, depending on whether you count the V30 and V45 as different generations). Why am I featuring this bike in this post today? Well, because he paid me $300 to do so*, and because I really, really enjoy these bikes. Back in 2004 (to early 2005,?) I had a 1995 Magna in that beautiful yellow, and to date it remains one of the bikes that look back upon, wistfully and longingly. I put maybe 10,000 miles on mine. magna1That generation of Magna was powered by the about-to-be-replaced VFR750 engine. The bike developed between 75 and 85 horsepower, and between 46 and 51 foot pounds of torque. Numbers vary as I suppose there were minor tuning variations between the years, and Honda has always been notoriously protective of engine performance specifications. Perhaps some values are measured at the wheel and some at the crank. Who knows... at any rate, the bike got down the road just fine. I won't say I won any races with mine, but it gave me quite a thrill riding it. Erik's bike looks like a very, very clean and well-kept example of what I consider one of the more understated and under appreciated machines on the road. While I typically prefer a solid-color paint scheme on most bikes, I like what Honda did with the graphics on the Magna... I guess it's meant to be a stylized flame or speed-induced striations. In any case, I like it. magna3The bike is pretty basic in appointments... drum rear brake, single disc front brake, very simple instrument cluster and a modicum of rider and pillion room. It's a fairly small frame bike, and at a little over 525 pounds wet and ready to ride, it's on the lighter side for something considered a cruiser. In typical cruiser fashion, the rider's legs are out front, but nothing I'd consider extreme. Not quite as far back as the Sportster's mid control configuration, but nothing stretched out like a Soft Tail or V-Rod, either. Call it "relaxed forward controls", if you have to call it something. I remember the handle bars being in a pretty neutral position, and honestly the only comfort and ergonomic modifications I made to mine were to install a very small shield and replace the stock seat. I had plans to take it on a solo cross-country trip... those plans never materialized during those years, but I felt the bike was fine for the job. I installed a set of Willie & Max synthetic leather saddle bags on a custom made aluminum rack I made, and had plans to install a Givi trunk on it... In fact, I still have the Givi E45 top case I bought shortly before selling the Magna. The VFR's engine was dressed with a bit of chrome, including chrome airbox covers, and the rest of the bike is decorated with enough functional chrome to stand out as nice looking without being gaudy. Erik keeps his looking much better than many I've seen; my wheels were never that clean. magna2I'm having some pretty serious knee issues these days, and keeping them tucked on the sportier bikes for any more than a half hour or so is all but impossible. I'm currently riding a VStrom by Suzuki, but if and when I decide to move to something that's more ergonomically friendly for my busted old bones, the Magna is on the short list. This generation of bike was built from 1993 (though marketed as an early '94) up through 2003 and remained unchanged, mechanically, through its life. The Magna was available in a variety of paint and graphic combinations throughout its run, including yellow, black, blue, red, purple   *No, Erik didn't really pay me $300 to feature his bike, but if he does, I'll be sure to let you know.

The Helmet Hook by eXtuff

If you're like me, when you just need to walk away from the bike for a few minutes you might often find yourself putting your helmet on your handle bar and checking it for stability 8 or 10 times before walking away, fearing the whole time that it will fall off and burst into a million pieces the second someone sneezes anywhere in the parking lot. Because of this, I usually just carry my helmet with me. Wouldn't it be nice to have a stable and trusted way of just hanging the helmet on the bike somewhere for a few minutes while you fuel up, get an ice cream cone or make a phone call? Well, now you can. Enter, the Helmet Hook. The Helmet Hook is, as the name might imply, a hook for your helmet. The hook is designed to bolt onto the handle bar end, between the bar and the bar-end weight. Most bikes these days have some sort of damping weight on the ends of the handle bars, so the number of bikes on which this *won't* work should be small and fleeting. hooks2To install the hook, you simply unscrew or unbolt your existing weight, slide the screw or bolt through the hook and reinstall the weight. The weight has a sizing washer in the center to help accommodate various mounting options across the plethora bikes and manufacturers. Take a look and send George a note if you like the product. The Helmet Hook product can be ordered directly from eXtuff's website and the price includes shipping. Paypal is accepted and should make for a very easy purchasing experience.

Rowe Electronics (via Aerostich) PDM60

You often hear "just put in a relay" when people talk about adding power connections to a bike, but what does that really mean? Many people find it sufficient to simply hook up their electrical gadgets directly to a battery, or to some "key-on" power source. This may be fine enough for something as low-draw as a GPS or satellite radio, but for things that draw more power, this is usually a recipe for long-term disaster. The usual solution is to add a relay-controlled power circuit. Why? A relay is just a fancy switch that, for the actuator part of the relay, typically draws very little power. This lets you tap into an existing power source - your tail light circuit or your ignition switch circuit - to power the relay. Doing so puts very little additional stress on the bike's wiring. The battery is then connected to the switched part of the relay, allowing high-draw devices full power without harming the bike's existing wiring. relay_diagram_02A typical need for a relay circuit might be when a rider wishes to install a set of driving lights that draw as much as 15amps. That's not the type of power requirement that would safely be provided by tapping into most of the bike's existing circuits. The graphic shows a basic relay circuit. This allows you to have the relay do all the "heavy work" while not impacting the bike's generally small and fragile wiring; if you were to hook up the larger road lights to the existing headlight circuit, you would likely overload that circuit causing blown fuses and overheated wires. A simple circuit to be sure, and it is very limited. What if I want more flexibility? Excellent question. The next upgrade to this circuit would be to replace "device" (in the graphic) with a fuse box. A fuse box will take current coming into it from the relay (or battery if directly connected) and spread it out to a number of fused circuits. This allows you to run several additional items into one centralized, convenient location for power, and to protect those additions via fuses. This has been the standard for... well, as long as there has been power systems in homes, cars, boats, industrial buildings, etc. Fuses and more modern circuit breakers are the standard protection for electrical devices. That can end up with a lot of additional wiring and space being used by the fuse block and relay. Some bikes accommodate the extra pieces better than others. A modern, electronic power distribution system may be the next best solution for some riders. Enter, the Rowe Electronics PDM60. adWpEKsThe PDM60 module replaces the fuse box and the relay system with a simple-to-use, compact, highly sophisticated electronic circuit controller. This intelligent device sense electrical shorts and, rather than blowing a fuse, simply turns off power that circuit. When the short is resolved, the PDM60 turns power back on to that circuit. No more burned wires, blown fuses, and best of all, dangerous shorts and burning wires are all but eliminated. The PDM60 wires up directly to the battery and the various protected circuits are powered on and off by 'trigger' wires. In its normal configuration there's one positive (12v+) and one ground (frame or 12v-) trigger, 6 total circuits ranging from 5amps to 15amps, and two circuits with a delayed shut off. This allows quite a bit of flexibility when deciding on what to hook up and how it should be handled. Most riders will need a simple setup where the PDM turns on the circuits when the bike's key is turned on. With something like this, the PDM would be hooked up directly to the battery, and the 12V+ trigger would be hooked up to anything that comes on with the bike's ignition switch, such as the tail light, head light, aux power connector, etc. The PDM draws about 1milliamp for the trigger, so it will have no practical impact on any existing circuits. During my installation, I chose to have the 12v+ trigger hooked up to my tail lights, and the PDM's main connections hooked directly to the battery. As for the circuits, I chose a 5amp delayed-off circuit for my phone charger plug, a 15amp instant-off circuit for my dedicated tire-pump plug, and a 5-amp instant-off circuit for my GPS connection. I mounted the PDM directly into the storage tray under my seat, and ran the main power wires to the battery through holes I drilled in the storage tray. The PDM comes with eyelets preinstalled on the main power wires; these eyelets should fit most normal motorcycle battery connectors. The electrical accessories are connected directly to the PDM60 on one of the supplied output wires. In my case, the purple wire was a delayed-off 5amp circuit, and the red wire was the instant-off 15amp output. I connected and soldered the colored wires to the appropriate 12v positive side of the accessory. The PDM also includes leads that slide into the big connector to provide 12v- (ground) connection; this alleviates the need to connect the negative side of the accessories to the battery or frame ground. Once all the accessory circuits were wired in, I tapped into the tail light wire for the 12v+ trigger. On my unit, this was the grey wire. Each of the power and trigger leads are marked with stickers. I stripped back the tail light wire's insulation and soldered the trigger wire to it, then taped it back up and put it back in its normal place. I use solder on all connections that are meant to be permanent. After years of automotive and motorcycle ownership and repair & maintenance, I simply don't trust most "tap connectors" or twist-n-tape connections. That's really all there was to it. The unit works as expected and as described, and the total installation took about 30 minutes. I forced-tested the ground faults by taking the output circuit wires and grounding them to the battery's negative post. The PDM shut off power to those circuits immediately without damage to any wiring and without any smoke, sparking or any other dangerous dramatic events. The unit I installed is a few years old. The newer models are firmware updatable and are software programmable; this allows the user to select specific amperage ranges for the various circuits, delayed or instant-off control of the circuits, and which circuits are controlled by the 12v+ or 12v- (ground) triggers. It's a very flexible and simple system, and I like it very much. The unit retails for $199. At nearly $200 it's considerably more expensive than a $12 relay and a $50 fuse block. Many riders might wonder why they should choose it. I can't and won't speak for Rowe Electronics on the matter, but I will offer my opinion. I've installed relay and fuse circuit systems on nearly every bike I've owned. In every case, I had to design the routing of wires, the placement of the fuse block and relay mounting, and in every case, it took me considerably longer than a half hour. In addition, relays can be compromised by moisture, and fuse blocks can corrode in high humidity or if they get wet. The PDM60 is waterproof, has no "moving" parts (covers over fuses, switch actuators in relays, etc), and is also small and easily mounted out of the way. The PDM is safer, less complex to use and is fully self-regulating. It's also fully CANBus compatible. And you'll never need to worry about keeping spare fuses around, or finding a Radio Shack if your relay craps out. Is that 'worth it' to you? I can't say. To me, it is... at least for a bike I intend to keep for longer term, or on which I want to rely for long distance travel. It's also very, very cool. That has certain value. The PDM60 is manufactured by Rowe Electronics and is distributed by several wholesalers and retailers, including Aerostich, the company from whom I got this unit and who is the world-famous manufacturer of the RoadCrafter and Darien series of riding gear. Rowe Electronics directs users to AltRider as their primary supporter and distributor of the PDM60.

We have archive RSS feeds available!

You asked and we have provided. You can now easily find past episodes on the site or in an RSS feed using the provided Archive categories and the links to the archive RSS feeds. Just below the "Contact" section on the site are links to the archived episodes grouped by year. Clicking on any of the archive links will direct your browser to display the RSS feed for the group of episodes. Depending on your podcatcher and browser, you may see links or options right on the page to subscribe without having to take any further steps. In most cases, however, you'll likely need to copy the URL from the address bar in the browser and paste it into your podcatcher. Most podcatchers and RSS readers will require similar enough steps. Below you will find instructions for subscribing to the feed in iTunes. If you have any problems or questions, get hold of anyone at The Pace Podcast by sending email to Feedback @ The Pace Podcast. We'll do whatever we can to help. iTunes subscription:

Locate the list of archive links below the "Contact" section on the main site. The archives are listed by calendar year.

Right click on the link for the desired archive year and select "Copy Link Location" (note: some browsers may word this differently - "Copy shortcut", "Copy link address", etc.))

Start iTunes and ensure you are in the Podcast section. Click on the Advanced menu.

Click on the Advanced menu, then select Subscribe To Podcast.

Paste the URL into the popup box and hit Enter. That's about it. You're downloading episodes. You may need to manually select older episodes from the list, but they should all appear as available for the selected year.

RD350 restoration project by Motorcycle Girl

Celeste, aka the Motorcycle Girl has been restoring an RD350 street bike. Below you can find some text and pictures about her restoration. Give it a look. Celeste can be found on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/celeste.atkinson.5.
I have not taken any recent pictures but enclosed is a link to the facebook album where I have posted some of them.  I bought it in several boxes and have been doing the ground up restoration over the last couple of winters.  The pic of the entire bike in the album is one that I found online so it is not my actual bike.  Tank and plastic parts are out getting painted as we speak and I hope to get the engine in the bike in the next couple of weeks. This model was never available in the US, only Canada so parts are more difficult to source locally.  Many of my parts have had to come from the UK where there is a cult following for this bike.  Interesting too is that Paul Manson(another listener) has one of these bikes too!
Pictures available at http://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.412275535659.214893.692950659&type=3&l=26447bfedd

The Vemar Jiano helmet

Another "multi-feature" helmet currently on the market is the Vemar Jiano. This helmet is a larger shell, modular helmet which includes an internal drop-down sun visor and integrated bluetooth communications. My friend Paul just ordered one and when it arrived, he brought it into my office for me to look over and take some pictures. He was also kind enough to let me try it on. The helmet fit me pretty well in size Large; it seemed to fit well for my roundish shaped head with no apparent pressure points or hot spots. I'm just coming off of 4 years wearing a Shoei Multitec. This helmet feels lighter than my old Shoei and has a similarly sized outer shell. The internal lining and padding felt good, and I didn't experience any "face squish" from overly large cheek pads. Vemar seemed to pay attention to detail of fit and finish. The controls for the visor, modular chin bar, vents and sun visor all seemed easy to use and intuitive. I did not try to use the controls with gloves, but given their placement and ease of operation, I suspect there will be no issues. The snow shoe style chin strap latch was also able to be opened with one hand using the convenient pull tab. A very nice feature, indeed. When the chin bar is open, one can easily see the mounting and routing of the flexible boom microphone. Also, the charging jack is prominently placed in the front for ease of connection. Open the chin bar, plug in the helmet, wait for charge. No battery or device removable is necessary. Again, a nice bit of attention to detail. I will ask Paulie to keep me updated on the bluetooth system's ease of use, volume and sound quality, and the helmet's wind noise levels. The Vemar Jiano is available for around $175 from various online retailers.