Episode 179: The things we don’t care about

Episode 179: The things we don't care about ThePaceFINAL-300x116
This week the guys pontificate on things they just don't care about... then comment on a few things they do care about. It's hard to tell with these guys. Do they like it? Do they not? Do they even know what they're talking about this week? It's a crap shoot; you just never know what these guys will like. You know what they do like though...? They like the new Indian Scout. They also like guessing and wondering and making complete off the cuff guesses about the new Ducati Scrambler. Again. While they're at it, and talking about things they care about, they discuss keeping warm in the high desert... or is that dessert? They discuss, again, gauntlet and armored gloves, and hey... They toss out a nod to Long Rider Radio. Review: Gel grips News: 2015 Indian Scout Ducati Scrambler (again) Things we don’t care about: 2015 Road Glide Indian Roadmaster Victory Magnum Links: Aerostich TL-Tec fleece http://www.streetskills.net/Jon_s_Articles/jon_s_articles.html Long Rider Radio Feedback:
  • Dan Klapman
  • Matt Szostak
  • Mike @ Long Riders Radio
  • Kahlil Seymour
  • Jon DelVecchio

Rowe Electronics (via Aerostich) PDM60

You often hear "just put in a relay" when people talk about adding power connections to a bike, but what does that really mean? Many people find it sufficient to simply hook up their electrical gadgets directly to a battery, or to some "key-on" power source. This may be fine enough for something as low-draw as a GPS or satellite radio, but for things that draw more power, this is usually a recipe for long-term disaster. The usual solution is to add a relay-controlled power circuit. Why? A relay is just a fancy switch that, for the actuator part of the relay, typically draws very little power. This lets you tap into an existing power source - your tail light circuit or your ignition switch circuit - to power the relay. Doing so puts very little additional stress on the bike's wiring. The battery is then connected to the switched part of the relay, allowing high-draw devices full power without harming the bike's existing wiring. relay_diagram_02A typical need for a relay circuit might be when a rider wishes to install a set of driving lights that draw as much as 15amps. That's not the type of power requirement that would safely be provided by tapping into most of the bike's existing circuits. The graphic shows a basic relay circuit. This allows you to have the relay do all the "heavy work" while not impacting the bike's generally small and fragile wiring; if you were to hook up the larger road lights to the existing headlight circuit, you would likely overload that circuit causing blown fuses and overheated wires. A simple circuit to be sure, and it is very limited. What if I want more flexibility? Excellent question. The next upgrade to this circuit would be to replace "device" (in the graphic) with a fuse box. A fuse box will take current coming into it from the relay (or battery if directly connected) and spread it out to a number of fused circuits. This allows you to run several additional items into one centralized, convenient location for power, and to protect those additions via fuses. This has been the standard for... well, as long as there has been power systems in homes, cars, boats, industrial buildings, etc. Fuses and more modern circuit breakers are the standard protection for electrical devices. That can end up with a lot of additional wiring and space being used by the fuse block and relay. Some bikes accommodate the extra pieces better than others. A modern, electronic power distribution system may be the next best solution for some riders. Enter, the Rowe Electronics PDM60. adWpEKsThe PDM60 module replaces the fuse box and the relay system with a simple-to-use, compact, highly sophisticated electronic circuit controller. This intelligent device sense electrical shorts and, rather than blowing a fuse, simply turns off power that circuit. When the short is resolved, the PDM60 turns power back on to that circuit. No more burned wires, blown fuses, and best of all, dangerous shorts and burning wires are all but eliminated. The PDM60 wires up directly to the battery and the various protected circuits are powered on and off by 'trigger' wires. In its normal configuration there's one positive (12v+) and one ground (frame or 12v-) trigger, 6 total circuits ranging from 5amps to 15amps, and two circuits with a delayed shut off. This allows quite a bit of flexibility when deciding on what to hook up and how it should be handled. Most riders will need a simple setup where the PDM turns on the circuits when the bike's key is turned on. With something like this, the PDM would be hooked up directly to the battery, and the 12V+ trigger would be hooked up to anything that comes on with the bike's ignition switch, such as the tail light, head light, aux power connector, etc. The PDM draws about 1milliamp for the trigger, so it will have no practical impact on any existing circuits. During my installation, I chose to have the 12v+ trigger hooked up to my tail lights, and the PDM's main connections hooked directly to the battery. As for the circuits, I chose a 5amp delayed-off circuit for my phone charger plug, a 15amp instant-off circuit for my dedicated tire-pump plug, and a 5-amp instant-off circuit for my GPS connection. I mounted the PDM directly into the storage tray under my seat, and ran the main power wires to the battery through holes I drilled in the storage tray. The PDM comes with eyelets preinstalled on the main power wires; these eyelets should fit most normal motorcycle battery connectors. The electrical accessories are connected directly to the PDM60 on one of the supplied output wires. In my case, the purple wire was a delayed-off 5amp circuit, and the red wire was the instant-off 15amp output. I connected and soldered the colored wires to the appropriate 12v positive side of the accessory. The PDM also includes leads that slide into the big connector to provide 12v- (ground) connection; this alleviates the need to connect the negative side of the accessories to the battery or frame ground. Once all the accessory circuits were wired in, I tapped into the tail light wire for the 12v+ trigger. On my unit, this was the grey wire. Each of the power and trigger leads are marked with stickers. I stripped back the tail light wire's insulation and soldered the trigger wire to it, then taped it back up and put it back in its normal place. I use solder on all connections that are meant to be permanent. After years of automotive and motorcycle ownership and repair & maintenance, I simply don't trust most "tap connectors" or twist-n-tape connections. That's really all there was to it. The unit works as expected and as described, and the total installation took about 30 minutes. I forced-tested the ground faults by taking the output circuit wires and grounding them to the battery's negative post. The PDM shut off power to those circuits immediately without damage to any wiring and without any smoke, sparking or any other dangerous dramatic events. The unit I installed is a few years old. The newer models are firmware updatable and are software programmable; this allows the user to select specific amperage ranges for the various circuits, delayed or instant-off control of the circuits, and which circuits are controlled by the 12v+ or 12v- (ground) triggers. It's a very flexible and simple system, and I like it very much. The unit retails for $199. At nearly $200 it's considerably more expensive than a $12 relay and a $50 fuse block. Many riders might wonder why they should choose it. I can't and won't speak for Rowe Electronics on the matter, but I will offer my opinion. I've installed relay and fuse circuit systems on nearly every bike I've owned. In every case, I had to design the routing of wires, the placement of the fuse block and relay mounting, and in every case, it took me considerably longer than a half hour. In addition, relays can be compromised by moisture, and fuse blocks can corrode in high humidity or if they get wet. The PDM60 is waterproof, has no "moving" parts (covers over fuses, switch actuators in relays, etc), and is also small and easily mounted out of the way. The PDM is safer, less complex to use and is fully self-regulating. It's also fully CANBus compatible. And you'll never need to worry about keeping spare fuses around, or finding a Radio Shack if your relay craps out. Is that 'worth it' to you? I can't say. To me, it is... at least for a bike I intend to keep for longer term, or on which I want to rely for long distance travel. It's also very, very cool. That has certain value. The PDM60 is manufactured by Rowe Electronics and is distributed by several wholesalers and retailers, including Aerostich, the company from whom I got this unit and who is the world-famous manufacturer of the RoadCrafter and Darien series of riding gear. Rowe Electronics directs users to AltRider as their primary supporter and distributor of the PDM60.

Episode 133 – Fourth annual holiday gift guide

Episode 133 - 4th annual holiday gift guide November, 25, 2012
Welcome to the Fourth Annual Pace Podcast Holiday Gift Guide. This year, we kept the gifts simple, the budgets small and the ideas practical. Let the gift giver know you have simple needs, and for you gift givers, let the riders close to you know you're thinking of them. Theme song composed and performed by Raoul Lowe. Ending song, White Christmas, performed by Twisted Sister.

Episode 116 – Let’s be clear… I’m not saying I don’t like racing.

Episode 116 - Let’s be clear... I’m not saying I don’t like racing. June 10, 2012
What’s there to say about this week’s show...? Well, Chris says we’re wasting fuel in racing, but the consensus is what he really means is, the PERCEPTION is that fuel is being wasted on racing, meanwhile bike MFGs are making bikes that go faster, harder, more and bigger, but there’s no priority being put on MPG. So, ya know, don’t hate the guy for his comments. James and Chris both have work to do on their SVs and thank goodness the weather is only in the low 90s so they won’t die of heat stroke working on the bikes.Lower cost Raptors in the US...? Yes. And even factoring in US-based labor. Go figure. Ride to Work Day is coming up, so we’re going to see all The Pace Podcast’s listeners on the road on June 18th, right? RIGHT? Yes, of course we are. The good news is, Garmin has released the new Zumo with lifetime maps. Now you have NO excuse not to ride to work, right? RIGHT? Good. I’m glad that’s settled. Oh, and there are some juicy links to various things... check ‘em out. News: Misc links: Feedback:
  • Thom Butterfield
  • Darren Dykes
  • Bryan Conley
  • Jay Knight
  • Matt Murto on hot weather riding
  • Russell Hoffman
  • Colleen First

Episode 113: Repetitive, Silly and Stupid

Episode 83: The Hondacati Conspiracy

Episode 83 - The Hondacati Conspiracy. August 21, 2011
Please note that due to technical issues, the Busa Rap from Raul Lowe is not included in the podcast, but can be found at ( http://www.busabeats.com/#trackid=10932 ). 
This week is an audio and sensory extravaganza! We’ve got feedback galore and a fantastic book review from friend of the show, Beth Clark. In addition, we have a link - sorry, no direct audio recording, sadly - of a Busa-inspired rap song from Raul Lowe. Lots of fun! The guys talk about Aerostich’s latest product, the sized and purpose-built LokSack weather proof storage bags designed for all your common electronic gizmos, and sized to fit in the Aerostich RoadCrafter and Darien suits. Oh, and they’ll fit in your tank bag, too. Check them out. The show says goodbye to motorcycling legend, Claudio Castiglioni, discusses the newest Victory offerings, and notes that Ducati has fallen victim to the Honda 919 conspiracy - and by that they mean that 919 Ducaties were recalled for a minor defect that makes the Diavel models topple over[1]. The President signs into law the lead-ban exception for childrens’ motorcycles and ATVs, and we get some pictures of the 2012 CBR1000RR from Honda. Stick around for feedback. Feedback
  • Steve Hanning opines on lane sharing and relates a story or two
[1] - (please note - Honda really had nothing to do with the Ducati recalls, and there is no known Honda Conspiracy)

Episode 80: That’s not fear, it’s healthy respect

Moto Morini LIVES... again. A Turbo Busa hits 300 MPH, the motorcycle market is almost flat, Ducati is way, way up and Aerostich thinks you should be able to filter (so do we). Then I try to make Chris mad during the feedback segment. It didn't work. I'll try harder next time.

Episode 76: Damn it’s Wednesday, need a new engine

The on-going saga of the SV's self consuming engine comes to a favorable end and the Sprint gets a grip. It's not all rainbows and unicorns though, Chris has his own tale of motorcycling woe to impart this week. It looks like Husqvarna has a promising new street bike in the pipe and Honda may have a new middleweight nudie bike (we hope!). Canada gets serious about noise, Aerostich wants to let use your smartphone with gloves on and we have lots of good stuff from listeners like you. There's a gear review from Josh Davis, a video from Paul Jones, an audio sample from Jeff Gilbert and recommendations from Todd Lampone and Matt.

Episode 71: I Wouldn’t Hear it While I’m Being Incinerated

This is the part where we write a little paragraph that tells you what we talked about in this weeks show. And it goes a little somethin' like this... Motus is making more noise, Chris got some new stuff, Leicester County in the U.K. is giving away retina burning backpacks and Chip Yeats goes really fast on an electric bike. We got a boat load of feedback from Denver Conway, David Laniuk, Ryan Hettenbach, Brian Medley, Ben Island and Mike Sandler. Thank you all. We talked a little bit about my review of the Cycle Gear branded knock-offs of the CRG mirrors. That review was written before I moved my page to a new platform and it didn't survive the transition very well. I'll post those links once I get it fixed but here's the big take away: You get what you pay for. We also talked about what we're going to talk about next week. We'd really like your help with that. You can find the Craftsman Experience presents Erik Buell Racing video below. What do think all of this means for EBR as it relates to street bikes?

Episode 55: What are you getting me for Christmas?

Ep 55 for Dec 5th, 2010 Happy Holidays!!! With a visit and a little help from Prubert Claus, James & I bring you some selections from our Holiday Gift List. We highlight some things that we have and can recommend, as well as make some suggestions that we... er... your loved ones would like to see under the tree. With our... uh... the listeners’ best interests in mind, we try to offer some suggestions that span the range of usefulness and silly, and at all the typical price points. Just for the record, I’m going to need tires by spring and I’m thinking a nice set of Pilot Road 2s in your standard 120/180 pairing would be great. Ya know... as an example. We also bring you some suggestions from the listeners by way of email and voice mail, and Prubert weighs in with some great additional ideas.
  • Glen Allison suggests heated gear. Any heated gear.
    • “No matter what it is, my wife bought me a heated jacket and it’s the greatest gift ever (rivals the birth of my son) I vote any heated gear.”
Music is by The Legendary O'Lantern Brothers and Twisted Sister, and is provided by MusicAlley.com.