Episode 202 – Podcasters who have gone on a tangent and those who will

Episode 202 – Podcasters who have gone on a tangent and those who will
April 12, 2015

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This week the guys discuss the existential crisis of math as it pertains… ya know what? None of that happens. We do ramble on about the potential coolness of Honda, the Bulldog Concept, and then give a quick mention to some Yamaha recall news. Then we go on and on and on about the whole “those who crash and those who are going to crash” nonsense, give some luggage advice, create a drinking game and ring a bell (make out of a coffee mug). It’s all the rage. Get in on it!

News

Links

Feeback

  • Daniel Mozer
  • Kurt Wahtera
  • Scott Cloninger
  • Dan Klapman
  • Crispin Bennett
  • Dick Young

Episode 192 – January 2015 Riders’ Roundtable

Episode 192 – January 2015 Riders’ Roundtable discussion

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This week, James & Chris are joined by Todd from The Wheelnerds and Chris & Steve from The Cafe Racer Motorcycle Podcast.

The esteemed panel of experts lay out everything you can expect in 2015 with flawless logic, on-point analysis, and laser tight focus on the most important issues of the coming year.

Enjoy!

Episode 185: Harbinger of Doom

Episode 185: Harbinger of Doom

Recorded October 5th, 2014

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Review:

  • (update) Aeromoto Road Pro jacket

News:

Quick hits:

Feedback

  • Mike Roell

Theme music composed and performed by Raoul Lowe

And the winner is… (tank bag contest)

We had some great feedback and before we announce the name of the winner, I’d like to take a few minutes to do some analysis on the data (links to full spreadsheet below).

1451438_10152572800990586_4318535944745007321_nIn the spreadsheet, under the column for how you use the bike, we listed the primary use as we understood it, or the first listed u10561680_10152572800980586_6375634596334134982_nse of the bike in your text. For the mileage per year, we converted some to miles from Km, so that’s why your numbers might not be what you remember. In addition, for some of yo  u who listed multiple bikes in detail, the spreadsheet may show multiple entries for the bikes, but only one entry for your name. Where you gave us a range of miles, or a range of miles across multiple uses, we tried to do a reasonable estimation of the miles-per-use, or in some cases we just divided it evenly. We also selected the higher number of your range, generally, where it seemed to make the most sense. In some cases, where information was light, multiple bikes were listed in the notes rather than on line items.

10561771_10152572800985586_8851380805290577451_nPlease note: the contest is a random drawing of respondents’ names, and the data provided has absolutely no bearing on the selection process. You could have ridden a 50cc dirt bike 8 miles this year and still won. We just wanted to see what everyone rides and how they’re using it. The winner was selected by a random number drawing made at http://random.org.

Of the data provided, where all the elements were provided:

Manufacturers: 10
Most represented MFG: BMW & Suzuki
Lease represented MFG: Buell, Moto Guzzi, Ural
Models: 43
Most represented model: VStrom
Total miles reported: >412,000
Average miles per year: >8000
Highest reported yearly mileage: 38000
Lowest reported yearly mileage: 1000
Full spreadsheet can be viewed at this link.

And so, without any further ado… The winner of the magnetic tank bag, as chosen by random using the random number generator at http://random.org, is…  Sean Winters. Sean, we will reach out to you to get shipping information. Again, thank you everyone, and I hope this information is as interesting to you as it is to us.

Thanks!

Episode 183: That Sounds Like a Terrible Idea

Episode 183: That Sounds Like a Terrible Idea

Recorded on September 10, 2014

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mm-1967

Yep. That’s the one.

mm-1971

Another view. Because once just isn’t enough.

Episode 181: Harley Gone, Fun is On!

Episode 181 – Harley gone, fun is on!

Recorded August 24, 2014

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News:

Links:

Feedback:

  • Michael Montiel
  • Tom McGoldrick
  • Mike Evans
  • Quentin Lewis

Theme music composed and performed by Raoul Lowe

Episode 178: All These New Sensations

Episode 178: All These New Sensations

Recorded on July 30th 2014

Released on August 3rd 2014

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Episode 170 – RIP, Tamburini Man

Episode 170 – RIP, Tamburini Man
Recorded on: 4/10/2014
Released on: 4/13/2014

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Review:

 

News:

 

Honorable mention:

 

Links:

 

Feedback:

  • Martin Kniep

  • Jon DelVecchio

  • John Hart

  • Bryce Purden – from Tasmania

  • Jeff Hachmann

  • Dick Young

  • Greg Buckmaster

Episode 160: Partially Mental

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November 5th, 2013

News:

Notes on dry sump engines

Listener Stuart Watson sent us this email discussing dry sump engines, and their benefits and design details. Stuart pointed us at this link for more information.

The majority of road bikes use wet sump lubrication, the ‘sump’ being a pan beneath the crankshaft where the oil is stored. A pump picks it up from here and forces it around the engine into the various bearings, spray jets and so on. After the oil has passed through the high pressure part of the system it drains back down into the sump purely under the influence of gravity.

It’s simple and inexpensive, but there are disadvantages. The first is the size of the sump. Usually this will have to hold around 4 litres, maybe more. This is quite large – look at a 5 litre oil can to get an idea – and clearly it has to be at the lowest point, so the engine has to sit higher than might be ideal. Under hard acceleration or braking, or when the going is very bumpy, the oil in the sump can slosh around. In extreme cases this can mean the oil pump’s pick up tube becomes open to the air, and air bubbles are passed around the lubrication system, causing a lot of wear and damage. But it also means the oil can wash up against the crankshaft, which usually spins just above the surface of the sump oil. This causes a lot of drag, reducing engine performance as well as causing the oil to become foamy, which degrades its lubrication abilities.

The alternative is dry sump lubrication. Instead of storing the oil beneath the engine it’s kept in a separate tank somewhere else on the bike – in the frame on the Aprilia RSV Mille for example, or in the swingarm on air-cooled Buells. This means the engine can be positioned lower in the fraSemi_dry_sump_1me (very useful with naturally tall engines such as the V-twins mentioned), and the problems associated with oil sloshing around are eliminated. It’s easier to increase the oil capacity this way too, which means extended service intervals. The penalty is increased complexity (and hence cost), as you now need a separate tank and two oil pumps. One pump scavenges the oil draining down to the bottom of the engine and feeds it up to the oil tank, while a second, more powerful pump takes oil from the tank and feeds it back into the lubrication system under pressure.

Some bikes though use a semi-dry sump system, including many off-road machines as well as the BMW. What this really means is that the system is to all intents and purposes a dry sump design, with two oil pumps, but the oil tank is still incorporated inside the engine cases. In the F800’s case it’s still stored beneath the engine, but not directly beneath the crankshaft.

It’s a little more complex but by doing it this way the designers have more scope for lowering the engine and making it more compact.