Episode 219 – a lot of fire, a lot of passion

Episode 219 - A lot of fire, a lot of passion Recorded April 18, 2016 ThePaceFINAL-300x116
Reviews:
  • Firstgear TPG Rainier jacket review update
Links: Feedback:
  • Tom Reynolds
  • Matt Campe
  • Eric Kohnen
  Contest Winner:
  • David Lanning

Another contest idea, courtesy of Frank Rainieri

Listener Frank Rainieri came up with a cool contest idea: Create ONE post in this thread. Pick ONE bike from each modern, currently-doing-business manufacturer, that you think best represents the brand, and give us a few sentences on each explaining why. We'll pick a winner at random from those who give us the most qualifying bikes. Prize will be a "help you out on the road" gift pack pulled together from my garage - some new items, some gently used - that will hopefully make your bike travels more enjoyable, perhaps safer, and maybe more complete... in some way. Ready.... set... GO!

Episode 213 – All of it. Just all of it.

Episode 213 October 12, 2015 ThePaceFINAL-300x116
Catching up for lost time. We read feedback. All the feedback. Ever. And talk about some AIMExpo teases. Feedback:
  • Justin Eagle (from July)
  • Kurt Wahtera
  • Scott Bolton
  • Matt Campe (Springfield, IL)
  • Jeff Kirchman (I like this question ~ch)
  • John Bennett
  • Johan Kvande
  • Dave Edwards
 

Episode 194 – Brad Waldron of Kali Protectives

Episode 194: Brad Waldron of Kali Protectives ThePaceFINAL-300x116
This week James & Chris are talking with Kali Protectives founder, Brad Waldon. Owner Brad Waldron started out in aerospace R&D before pursuing his passions for riding and material science at the consumer level. For Brad there’s no point waking up in the morning if he’s not building the safest, smartest products possible. He knows materials, physics, and manufacturing so that you don’t have to. Chris & James, both, have owned and used Kali products for other two years, and consider Kali and serious contender in the top-shelf helmet market. You can find information about Kali and their products at http://www.kaliprotectives.com/

Episode 192 – January 2015 Riders’ Roundtable

Episode 192 - January 2015 Riders' Roundtable discussion ThePaceFINAL-300x116
This week, James & Chris are joined by Todd from The Wheelnerds and Chris & Steve from The Cafe Racer Motorcycle Podcast. The esteemed panel of experts lay out everything you can expect in 2015 with flawless logic, on-point analysis, and laser tight focus on the most important issues of the coming year. Enjoy!

The wisdom of maintenance

Motorcycles are something of a modern miracle wrapped in a thin layer of insanity. Take a lump of metal with some holes in it, add fuel and oxygen and light it on fire, creating a series of rapid, controlled explosions, and somehow deliver all that energy to a rotating assembly bolted on to the back of this crazy contraption, spinning on a metal rod held in place with tiny little fasteners. This is all happening on something that can't stand up on its own, mystifies riders and physics experts alike in how it does stay upright, and provides a rush of excitement and joy that relatively few people have ever felt. The motorcycle. A visceral, crazy, fun, enjoyable, dangerous, beautiful piece of mechanical art made of metal, plastic and dreams. And at the center of all this exists a machine. Like all machines, motorcycles require certain maintenance and attention to keep performing safely and at their peak. ID08L1HG27If you do all your own maintenance, there's a good chance you're very much in tune with your bike. When you put wrench to machine, you create a kind of intimacy and knowledge of that machine that no one else likely has. You'll know if something has loosened up. You'll feel if a wheel bearing you replaced three years ago feels a little odd. You'll understand that vibration you're feeling might indicate a tire has gone out of balance, or the chain has developed a tight spot. You know your bike better than anyone else ever could. Sure, mechanics get paid to know a lot about repairing and maintaining bikes... but only YOU know your bike like you do. If you don't do your own maintenance, consider getting involved in at least some of it. Even as a rider, you know your bike better than anyone, and doing even a small bit of the ongoing maintenance gives you opportunities to see things, to catch problems or to deepen your understanding of the machine that you might be missing if you take your bike to a shop for all of its maintenance. There are a number of tasks you can do on the maintenance list even without possessing a lot of mechanical aptitude or specialized tools. Kette_einsprühen_u._einwirken_lassenIf your bike is chain drive, you're probably already familiar with cleaning and lubricating your chain. If you're not, get your owner's manual out and get to work. A decent chain cleaning and oiling should only take you a few minutes once you're familiar with the task, and can be invaluable in prolonging the life of the chain (and the bike!), and increasing safety. It also gives you a chance to visually inspect the chain, the sprockets, the wheels and tires, and while you're at it, if your bike has rear disc brakes, you're probably only one head tilt away from looking at the thickness of your brake pads. You could potentially identify trouble spots on 3 or 4 different systems on the bike just by oiling your chain! If you're able to make yourself a cup of coffee in a modern coffee maker, I'm going to go out on a limb here and say you've got all the mechanical knowledge you need to at least attempt to do a basic oil change. Let's look at the steps necessary to do a full oil change on most motorcycles. Step 1 - warm up the engine. Step 2 - stop the engine, position the bike properly for the oil change (see your manual). Step 3 - slide a drain pan under the bike and take out the drain plug(s). Step 4 - remove the oil filter. Step 5 - replace the drain plug and install new filter. Step 6 - refill with oil. Step 7 - start bike, warm it up, shut it off, and check the oil level. Motorcycle-Oil-changeSure, I'm simplifying things, but your owner's manual - or better, buy a service manual - will have all the detail on those steps that you need to do the job. Some bikes will drain better on the side stand, also known as the kick stand. Others will drain better on the center stand, so do pay attention to your manual and do the work according to those guidelines. But all in all, it's a pretty simple job that will save you money, will allow you to really get hands on with the bike, and isn't that easy to get wrong. Once you've done it, you'll wonder why you never did before. You'll also be happy with the money you saved. Other maintenance tasks that might be worth doing include changing your air filter, replacing brake pads, or cleaning, lubricating and adjusting brake levers, and clutch levers and cables. Doing a lot of the little tasks can add up to huge savings over time, not only in keeping your bike out of the shop more ($), but in catching potential problems early and turning a costly repair into preventative maintenance. With any job you're doing for the first time, it's a good idea to have a little guidance. Always consult your owner's manual. As mentioned, getting hold of a service manual for your bike will not only give you detailed information particular to your model of bike, but may also list specific tools and equipment you'll need, and will walk you through the whole job, step by step. DSCF4183If you're a member of any online forums or local riders' groups, you might be able to find and attend a local tech day. A tech day is a great opportunity to meet other enthusiasts, and work with people who may be considerably more experienced in repair and maintenance, and can lend you all the guidance you need. If you can't find or host a tech day, you should still be able to make an online request for help and find someone local (enough) to lend a hand, or at least walk you through any trouble spots you may have. It's important to note that some maintenance is best left to those with more mechanical ability and experience if you're not comfortable with engine design, etc. For instance, throttle synchronizations or engine valve clearance checks can be very involved, and if done incorrectly, could render your bike unable to run, running poorly, or perhaps even damaged. What this article is discussing are the smaller, more pedestrian tasks. NickLabCoat2005Look for follow-up articles discussing the details of these and other home-based motorcycle maintenance tasks in the coming weeks. Who knows... we may even shoot some video! Keeping your bike running at its best doesn't need to include trips to the dealer for mundane things, spending a whole day waiting around, or writing a big check. Chris & James both have older bikes that require the occasional bit of attention, and the guys are hoping to start capturing more of that at-home maintenance with pictures and video... stay tuned.

Giveaway time… Jake Bible book pack

Ok The Pace Podcast listeners... It's giveaway time again.... This time I've got a four-book prize pack courtesy of sci-fi/horror author Jake Bible of Jake Bible's Wasteland. How do YOU win over $60 worth of books, signed by the author, you ask? Show me an artsy picture of your motorcycle. I'm not talking about walking out to your garage with your cell phone. Show us the bike(s) in a landscape or a cool location, give us some weird lighting or effects, or just plain show us a super-photogenic bike. Win Jake's "apex trilogy" including Dead Mech, The Americans and Metal and Ash, along with his YA novel, Little Dead Man. EMail your pictures to Feedback@thepacepodcast.com (and post them here for others to see, though we'll only take entries from email). We'll run the contest through the month of May. Get out and get some pictures! 11959_718325321558838_476214577999313616_n

What’s Cap riding…?

In the upcoming Captain America 2: The Winter Soldier, Cap is seen chasing someone down on a motorcycle. But, what is it? Hmmm. Ducati Monster made love to a Sportster and birthed this thing...? I've been trying to figure out just WHICH Sportster model it was, then I noticed a few tell-tale things on it that point it away from being a Sportie at all. Eh...? So, what are your guesses? Something one-off for the movie? Something upcoming? Something older that we just don't recognize? capsbike

October 23, 2013 – Happy Fourth! No, the other fourth.

October 23, 2013 - Happy Fourth! ThePaceFINAL-300x116
Four years we've been doing this show. Four years. Seems like just yesterday James and I were sitting on the upstairs balcony of the Deer Park Tavern in Newark Delaware enjoying a cold brew and talking about "... if I ever do a podcast..." And so here we are, on the fourth anniversary of our show returning to the veritable scene of the crime. If you're at all able, consider coming out to The Deer Park Tavern on Friday, October 25th (7pm) to join us in celebrating the event. Oh, and we're running a raffle for a prize, too. It's the review unit of the Aeromoto Sport Air leather jacket, submitted for review by Competition Accessories. Check out the full line of Aeromoto merchandise at the CompAcc site. Wow. Four years... A lot has happened over the last four years, and through it all, The Pace has been a part of my life. The feedback and support from our listeners has been nothing short of amazing. The friends James and I have made - or gotten to know better through the show and events - have been great additions to our lives. The time and effort we put into the show has always been a labor of love and we thank you, one and all, for letting us into your homes and ear buds each week. Thank you for four wonderful years. May the next forty be just as good.

October 25, 2013 at 7pm - celebrate the 4 year anniversary of The Pace at The Deer Park Tavern.

Aeromoto Sport Air leather jacket raffle

Competition Accessories' Aeromoto brand

The Helmet Hook by eXtuff

If you're like me, when you just need to walk away from the bike for a few minutes you might often find yourself putting your helmet on your handle bar and checking it for stability 8 or 10 times before walking away, fearing the whole time that it will fall off and burst into a million pieces the second someone sneezes anywhere in the parking lot. Because of this, I usually just carry my helmet with me. Wouldn't it be nice to have a stable and trusted way of just hanging the helmet on the bike somewhere for a few minutes while you fuel up, get an ice cream cone or make a phone call? Well, now you can. Enter, the Helmet Hook. The Helmet Hook is, as the name might imply, a hook for your helmet. The hook is designed to bolt onto the handle bar end, between the bar and the bar-end weight. Most bikes these days have some sort of damping weight on the ends of the handle bars, so the number of bikes on which this *won't* work should be small and fleeting. hooks2To install the hook, you simply unscrew or unbolt your existing weight, slide the screw or bolt through the hook and reinstall the weight. The weight has a sizing washer in the center to help accommodate various mounting options across the plethora bikes and manufacturers. Take a look and send George a note if you like the product. The Helmet Hook product can be ordered directly from eXtuff's website and the price includes shipping. Paypal is accepted and should make for a very easy purchasing experience.